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Tag Archives: managing people

Will this project manager make a good people manager?

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Sam’s team just delivered a complex project on-time, on-budget, and with impeccable quality. His company is eying him for promotion, because they want him to “rub off” on other project managers, whose results aren’t as stellar. Maybe he can teach them a trick or two? In theory, a good project manager can become a good » Read More

8 tips for effective employee praise

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If praising employees does not come naturally to you, here are a few tips for crafting words to motivate your team…

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How do you overcome an imperfect boss?

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When it comes to developing a great relationship with a boss, most of us can use all the help we can get. You have more power than you think.–Karin Hurt This is the heart of a great new book by Lead Change instigator Karin Hurt, who recently released “Overcoming an Imperfect Boss.” Drawing on a diverse background » Read More

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Managers: How well do you listen?

Managers: How well do you listen?

When employees come to speak with you, do you put everything down, turn off your phone, and feel truly eager to hear their thoughts? Few managers actually do this on a daily basis, and as a result, they are like air traffic controllers without radar. Listening is an active quest to understand the knowledge, concerns, insights and ideas your employees bring to the table, and you need this information to do your job well.

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3 Portraits of Employee Involvement

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In your organization, how much employee input does management get before deciding a course of action? Not much? You might want to rethink that.

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5 Challenges For Relationship-Oriented Managers

Often, managers who are good at Relating (asking, listening, coaching, including, and encouraging) shy away from Requiring activities (insisting on excellence, confronting poor or marginal performers, or just telling an employee what is expected or needed). Your job as a manager is to help employees achieve business goals and do outstanding work. To direct their efforts and help them deliver their best work, you need to be equally adept at Relating and Requiring skills. Are you?

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Stop greasing these 3 squeaky wheels

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“A ‘squeaky wheel’ isn’t the highest priority project. It’s the loudest or most noticed. In many organizations, it gets the grease, while projects with greatest potential to bring about business results get delayed or set aside.” This quote, from the book Everything’s A Project, is playing like a mantra in my thoughts. We focus on squeaky wheels because they are irritating, not because they are important. We want the irritation to go away. But oil isn’t the answer.

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5 ideas for improving how you manage people

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As a manager, you are responsible for a wide range of activities. Recruiting. Establishing a positive work environment in your group. Setting expectations. Managing performance. Making decisions. Coaching. Dealing with poor or marginal performers. Each of these responsibilities requires a unique blend of Relating and Requiring skills. Are you using the right combination, in each situation, to get great business results and foster strong relationships?

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Employee engagement: a three-legged stool

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Many authors have written about people management, project management or corporate culture as separate topics. But a new book by Ben Snyder ties together all three subjects and paints a clear picture of how they interact to nurture (or damage) employee engagement and organizational performance. Read this review, find the book and set fire to the status quo.

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Coaching an Employee to Change a Bad Habit

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One of your employees has a career-limiting habit. As a manager, your job is to hold up a mirror to create awareness of the behavior and its consequences—and to help your employee through the change process. Here’s a conversation framework to improve your chances of securing the desired new behavior.

© 2014 Lead Change Group