Sep
17

Strengths – Energy, Talents and Passions

by  Mike Henry  |  Leadership Development

Over the past couple of weeks we’ve been talking about strengths.  This is the final post in a 5-part evaluation of Strengths. Strengths are the combination of Energy, Talents and Passions. But strengths without achievement are nothing.  Achievement, significant, material, long lasting, world-changing achievements seem to always result from the application of strengths.

Therefore I suggest the following formula for achievement:

Achievement = Focus X Time X Strengths

Strengths = Energy X Talents X Passion

High achievers seem to accomplish more because they get more out of their time and resources.  They eliminate, remove or minimize distractions (focus) and they do so using their resources of time, money, connections and influence.  Resources are a factor in achievement; but only one factor.  Lack of resources can be overcome by greater focus or the multipliers that make up our strengths.  In the same way, abundant resources are no guarantee of achievement.  Resources are almost nothing unless directed toward our strengths and away from our weaknesses.

All of this takes on significant depth and complexity when you multiply each factor by the number of people on your team.  Even a small team creates enormous complexity in this process because of the number, scope and relationships of the variables involved.  Successful teams are both rare and enjoyable because of the scope, range and number of combinations and interactions between different strengths.  Each individual’s strengths (energy, talents and passion) multiply the other factors in the overall results.  A single negative value or weak link can make the team a tremendous failure.

Also, many times the obstacles and the opposition become more complex as well.  When everything clicks, it’s a symphony.  If you think back to your greatest achievements, I think you’ll find that they point the way to your strengths; those things that are important to you (passion), you do well (talents) and energize you.  And many of those may have happened when you were part of a team.  Great achievements result from engaged team members bringing energy, talents and passion together with relentless focus and adequate resources.

Now what?

So now that you’ve identified your strengths, how will they play out?  What type of difference can you make as you concentrate your time working in your areas of greatest strength?


How will you create your symphony?

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About The Author

Articles By mike-henry
Chief Instigator (Founder) of Lead Change Group and VP of IT for a mid sized technology company. Passionate about character-based leadership and making a positive difference.  »  View Profile

What People Are Saying

Wally Bock  |  17 Sep 2009  |  Reply

Strengths are important but it’s Focus and fit that often turn them into team productivity. If your symphony doesn’t require an oboe, having a world-class oboist doesn’t do you much good. And if you need an oboist but have to make due with a clarinet player who can play oboe, you’ve got a different kind of trouble.
.-= Wally Bock´s last blog ..9/16/09: Midweek Look at the Independent Business Blogs =-.

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