Feb
23

Who Cares? – The Origins of the Lead Change Group Part 7

by  Mike Henry  |  Leadership Development

Who Cares? - Origins of Lead Change Group Part &Leaders care.

One thing I care about is that I not do nothing. When I see something that needs to be done, especially in the leadership space, I don’t want to be a tourist, trying something a little and then going back where I was. What we do should impact us and change us as well as changing those around us.

So when I decided to get involved in social media and leadership development, I wanted to see what would happen. I didn’t want to show up, look around, check a box and go back to who I was. Rather than simply taking a trip, I planned to relocate.

It also matters to me that we not lead the way we always have. It matters to me that more and more people step up and make a difference. That’s not unique to me or to Lead Change, but those of us who shared a common passion about leadership also cared that others share that passion too. Lead Change started out as a “a few, caring.”

“Caring is the key emotion at the center of the tribe. Tribe members care what happens, to their goals and to one another… If no one cares, then you have no tribe. If you don’t care – really and deeply care – then you can’t possibly lead.” Seth Godin.

We cared. In those early days we showed up on Twitter and LinkedIn. We read each other’s blogs. We had conference calls and Skype calls and tweet chats. We joined each other in blog post series. Fifteen of us even met face-to-face in Florida in February, 2010.

We didn’t all care about the same things and we weren’t all available at the same times. But over time, people started collaborating on their own. I was energized because I’d see people who connected through Lead Change go on to create something together. Slowly, we began to create some momentum, some economy.

Today, I’m aware of dozens of collaborations that started in Lead Change. I know people who did websites for others, promoted books, coached others, created training and content; referred coaching assignments, speaking gigs, and even people who have been hired for contract work through Lead Change. Individually, we could have made those things happen too. But in actuality, we did them together. We made the commitment to do something different.

What about you? Will your 2013 be 2012 part 2 or 2010 part 4? Or will this year be different? What are you doing to make sure 2013 is a different year? Care to share?

Our Instigators still care.  We get together and collaborate. We’ve become friends. In 2013 we will have a series of collaboration calls and a series of calls on forming local leadership development communities. We want to make a difference and we’re willing to commit a little time and money to the effort. What are you willing to do in 2013 to ensure you make a bigger difference than you ever have before?

This is the seventh part of a series on the origins of the Lead Change Group based on one of the key books that inspired me to take action: Tribes by Seth Godin. For links to all the posts, check out this page.

 

 

About The Author

Articles By mike-henry
Chief Instigator (Founder) of Lead Change Group and VP of IT for a mid sized technology company. Passionate about character-based leadership and making a positive difference.  »  View Profile

What People Are Saying

Mike Manciel  |  24 Feb 2013  |  Reply

Great topic Mike. I am a subscriber to the Lead Change community and I am always encouraged and inspired by the great content you guys post. I am a new blogger and would love to link up with some more experienced artist to learn more about the skill. What advice would you give a rookie who’s interested in trying to take it to the next level? I could use all the advice I could get.

Thanks,
Mike

David M. Dye  |  25 Feb 2013  |  Reply

What a powerful statement:

“One thing I care about is that I not do nothing. When I see something that needs to be done, especially in the leadership space, I don’t want to be a tourist, trying something a little and then going back where I was. What we do should impact us and change us as well as changing those around us.”

That’s what it’s all about!

Thanks, Mike,

David

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