LX – How Is Your Leadership Experience?

Much of our leadership is given to ensure our customers have the best CX – customer experience – or if you are in the tech industry, the best UX – user experience.

CX and UX. These symbols of experience are some of the core metrics and focuses that organizations hone in on to ensure they are meeting differentiation and success in delivering the best experience to their external customers.

Yet how many of us are measuring what our internal customers – your staff – are experiencing?

In other words, how many of your employees are having the best LX – Leadership Experience?

I used the term internal customers purposefully here to leverage what LX means. While not in vogue as before, leaders are to provide cultures that deliver and serve their external customers a quality experience. However, many of those same leaders fail to give the same level of culture and service to their internal people, their employees and teams.

That’s where Leadership Experience emerges. It’s the intersection of the relationship between employees and leaders, and the process of enhancing that working and cultural relationship within the organization.

This is not a new concept, as there are already LX conferences and courses that have been underway for a couple of years. But to better promote functional and synergistic workplaces, attract better talent, and feed the CX and UX experiences for your customers, LX should be at this point more of a leadership mindset to adopt to your own circumstances.

Just like the customer or user experiences, the leadership experience you generate is not a cookie-cutter plug-and-play process. It’s defined by the behaviors, skills, and relationships that comprise your teams as well as meet the needs, not only for improving morale and performance, but for strengthening a culture that becomes healthy, beneficial to all, and successful in its goals.

We can look around today and see the poor LX that many workplaces have – pro sports teams, businesses, municipal departments, non-profit organizations, and even political organizations. Just a casual perusal of many of these mentioned gives cause to ponder what a great LX can do for any of those organizations. We can all imagine examples of these entities and how they could be transformed with a better leadership experience.

Yet it starts with you and me, where we are, and the sphere we influence in our current roles.

So how can you provide the best LX in your world, right now, today?

Let’s ponder what your organization’s LX journey will be, and how it can make an impact in how others experience your leadership.